Mid-Kent Astronomical Society
The James Irwin Observatory is
Confirmed CLOSED
It will remain closed until further notice.

EVENTS
DATEDETAILS
11-Dec

Spectroscopy for amateur observers and virtual quiz social
Virtual presentation by ZOOM

In this last meeting before Christmas we will have a mix of science and fun. Enjoy your mince pies and your favourite tipple virtually alongside other Members whilst we listen to a presentation by David Rees. David will tell us about spectroscopy and how we as amateur observers can use light spectra to identify star types.

After David's presentation Graham Finch will run a short fun trust based quiz. No prizes - just a bit of fun for you to pit your wits against other Members.

08-Jan-2021

Dr: Julian Onions - The Far Side of the Moon - is it full of Aliens?
Virtual presentation by ZOOM

Following his hugely popular talk last year Julian returns with what will be another fascinationg presentation.

The Moon is a shy body, it only ever shows one side of itself to the Earth. Before the space age, we had no idea what was on the far side of the Moon. This has led to a number of conspiracy theories that it is a haven for aliens. In this talk, we'll chart the progress of how we got to see what was on the far side of the Moon, and what we found there. Tin foil hats are optional!

We will hopefully also find out more about the proposed NASA Artemis misions.



29-Jan-2021

Colin Stuart - How to weigh the Universe and Planet X
Virtual presentation by ZOOM

Colin makes a welcome return to MKAS. In this talk Colin explains how we calculate the weight of all the matter in the Universe and also why we think there is another undiscovered planet (Planet X) in our own Solar system.

12-Feb-2021

Jonathan Tate - Near Earth Objects and the risks to humanity.
Virtual presentation by ZOOM

Approximately 65 million years ago a large celestial object struck the Earth and caused a mass extinction event wiping out the dinosaurs. In more recent times a large object fell to Earth in Chelyabinsk causing widespread damage and many casualties.

We know the Earth bears the scars of many such impacts but when will the next one occur and how severe will it be? Can we detect incoming objects and, if so, what can be done to protect us from the effects of an impact? In the talk Jonathan explains the work of the Safeguard Centre UK, based in Wales, in finding and tracking the many near earth objects.

26-Feb-2021

Will Joyce - The outer planets
Virtual presentation by ZOOM

In this presentation Will summarises our current understanding of the outer planets in our Solar System and their most interesting natural satellites using recent imagery from telescopes and spacecraft. The atmospheres, interiors and local space environments of the gas and ice giant planets will be discussed along with their roles in the evolution of the Solar System. A major surprise of the early Space Age was the discovery that several outer planet moons are, or were, active worlds in their own right, and this talk will also explore some of these fascinating objects.


12-Mar-2021

Prof Ian Morison - dark matter,dark energy and ---
Virtual presentation by ZOOM

In this talk Ian provides information on the vast majority of the Universe which is unseen. So how do we know about it and why is it that so far we have found no direct way of observing it?

Hopefully Ian will also explain about gravitational lensing and micro lensing and how this is helping us study atmospheres around exoplanets.

26-Mar-2021

Dr Megan Argo - When galaxies collide
Virtual presentation via ZOOM

Once upon a time we thought the Universe was static and unchanging. These days of course, we know differently. The whole Universe is in motion and, from time to time, galaxies pass too close to each other and gravity takes over; the results are often spectacular. Join us for a tour of the universe as we look at what galaxies are made of, take a bird’s-eye view of our own Milky Way, then look at what happens when gravity becomes irresistible, and ending with a sneak preview of our own galaxy’s distant future

09-Apr-2021

Damian Peach - High Resolution Astrophotography - imaging the planets with amateur telescopes
Bredhurst Village Hall

We are delighted and very fortunate to have one of the world's leading amateur lunar and planetary imagers with us to explain how to capture great pictures of the planets.

Even if you do not think you have the necessary equipment or skills you can still marvel at the exceptional images that Damian has captured over the years.

Damian Peach

Damian A. Peach FRAS is a British amateur astronomer, astrophotographer, lecturer and author. Best known for his photographs of a wide variety of astronomical objects. His career in the field spans nearly thirty years.

Peach's passion for Astronomy first began in 1988 inspired by books in his school library. Later he joined the British Astronomical Association (BAA) in 1996 and since then has contributed large amounts of observations to the various observing sections and also written and co-authored many papers in the organizations journal. He was awarded the organizations prestigious Merlin Medal in 2006. The same year he was also awarded the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers (ALPO) Walter H. Haas award for his contributions.

Peach has provided astronomical images for magazines and books throughout his career. His images have featured in Astronomy Magazine, Sky & Telescope, Astronomy Now & The Sky at Night. He has also authored articles on astrophotography for these magazines. Peach has also been a co-author on several professional scientific papers on planetary astronomy, especially regarding work on Mars and Jupiter. He was one of only a few amateur astronomers to have work featured as part of the national Explorers of the Universe exhibition at the Royal Albert Hall in 2007. His work has also appeared at the Edinburgh Science Festival, and The Royal Greenwich Observatory.

Peach's work has also been used by NASA and ESA to illustrate what ground based telescopes can achieve in photographing the planets, and the support they can provide to professional space probe missions.

In 2011 Peach was crowned overall winner of the Royal Greenwich Observatory astrophotographer of the year competition, and was a prize winning finalist in 2012 - 2018. He also won 1st place in the National Science Foundation's Comet ISON photo competition for his image of the comet which was used by the media throughout the world during the comet's close approach to the Sun.

Peach has also appeared on BBC television in the UK. He first appeared on the BBC's All Night Star Party program in 2003 where he imaged Mars live for the program from the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, La Palma. Following that he made many appearances as a guest on the BBC's Sky at Night astronomy program hosted by Sir Patrick Moore. He has also appeared on BBC news and The Discovery Channel. Peach has also conducted many public talks to both amateur and professional organizations over the past 20 years. In 2015 he was made Honorary president of Adur Astronomical Society in the UK.

In 2017 he formed part of a small team of observers who used the famous Pic du Midi Observatory 1.06m telescope to obtain some of the most detailed ever ground based images of Jupiter and Saturn. The same year asteroid 27632 was re-named Damianpeach by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) for his contributions to amateur astronomy. In 2018 he was elected to the board of the Aster Academy scientific committee and also awarded the Astronomical Legaue's prestigious Peltier award again for his contributions to astronomy.


  
MEETING VENUES

REGULAR MEETINGS:
Bredhurst Village Hall

Hurstwood Road,
Bredhurst, Gillingham,
Kent ME7 3JZ
(Close to J4 off the M2)
There is a car park on site.
Starts 7:45pm for 8pm.

OBSERVATORY EVENINGS:
James Irwin Observatory

Meet in the Conservatory at:
Victoria Hotel
59 London Road,
Canterbury, Kent
CT2 8JY
You will then be escorted to the observatory at 8:30pm (Oct-Mar) / 9pm (Apr-Sep)
BREDHURST MEETINGS VISITOR INFORMATION
[default]
Following the presentation there will be a tea break giving a chance to talk with other MKAS members and then an observing session in the field behind the hall (weather permitting) and a telescope workshop in the hall, so if you are having problems with your telescope (or just want to show it off) bring it along.

The meeting is open to non-members who are welcome to attend for free on their first visit.
Everyone of all ages and levels of expertise is welcome, including complete beginners.

There is a small entrance fee for each meeting to cover costs for tea and coffee.

Please dress appropriately for the weather, and be ready for observing, if it is clear. Remember that it can get very cold, especially in winter, so bring several layers or your warmest winter coat, as you feel appropriate.

All of our regular meetings are held on the second and last Friday of each month, except August and at Christmas, when there are no meetings.
All regular meetings are held at Bredhurst Village Hall unless otherwise stated.
Meetings normally start at 7.45pm for 8pm.
Bredhurst Village Hall : Hurstwood Road, Bredhurst, Gillingham, Kent ME7 3JZ
Bredhurst is close to J4 off the M2. There is a car park on site.

See our website EVENTS page for details of our forthcoming meetings.


All persons under 18yrs must be accompanied by a parent/guardian or responsible adult.

www.midkentastro.org.uk




[default-copy]
Following the presentation there will be a tea break giving a chance to talk with other MKAS members and then an observing session in the field behind the hall (weather permitting) and a telescope workshop in the hall, so if you are having problems with your telescope (or just want to show it off) bring it along.

The meeting is open to non-members who are welcome to attend for free on their first visit.
Everyone of all ages and levels of expertise is welcome, including complete beginners.

There is a small entrance fee for each meeting to cover costs for tea and coffee.

Please dress appropriately for the weather, and be ready for observing, if it is clear. Remember that it can get very cold, especially in winter, so bring several layers or your warmest winter coat, as you feel appropriate.

All of our regular meetings are held on the second and last Friday of each month, except August and at Christmas, when there are no meetings.
All regular meetings are held at Bredhurst Village Hall unless otherwise stated.
Meetings normally start at 7.45pm for 8pm.
Bredhurst Village Hall : Hurstwood Road, Bredhurst, Gillingham, Kent ME7 3JZ
Bredhurst is close to J4 off the M2. There is a car park on site.

See our website EVENTS page for details of our forthcoming meetings.


All persons under 18yrs must be accompanied by a parent/guardian or responsible adult.

www.midkentastro.org.uk




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